History

The Akaflieg Munich was founded on July 8, 1924. On this very day, about a hundred students met in the Auditorium No. 532 of the Technical University of Munich. The gathering was initiated by two professors, S.Finsterwalder and C.Prinz, who intended to found an "Academic Flying Group" in order to instruct students to fly.

Soon after the founding convention, the Akaflieg counted more than 300 members. The first head of the group, Dr.H.Weidinger, taught his students the basics in aerodynamics. By the end of 1924, the first glider, Mü1 "Vogel Roch", had been completed and tested. In 1926, the Akaflieg took part in a construction contest for the first time: the self-constructed Mü2 'Münchner Kindl' was presented at the famous Rhön-Contest on the Wasserkuppe mountain near Frankfurt. That same year, an office and a construction office in the university's tower was allocated to the young group, as well as a workshop in the basement. (Today, the Akaflieg still holds the office and construction office in the tower, high above the roofs of Munich.) The flying ranch was situated in the little town of Prien at the Chiemsee lake. As their mascot, the students chose "Huckebein, the Raven", a most rebellic cartoon bird invented by the famous German poet and cartoonist Wilhelm Busch.

 

In 1928, the Akaflieg acquired a Klemm L25 tow plane with a 20hp-Mercedes-motor. 'Wim' Hoffmann successfully landed on the "Zugspitzplatt" (a plateau near the summit of the 2963m-high Zugspitze, Germany's highest mountain) with this snow Auf dem Stachusskid-equipped L25 in 1929 - a stunning, record-breaking achievement. Motor flying gained more and more importance in the group, documented by the purchase of a Messerschmidt Me23 and a Focke-Wulf S1. Nevertheless, gliders were still built and flown. The Mü10 'Milan', a well-received design of Akaflieg's Egon Scheibe, became the symbol of the so-called 'Münchner Schule' (School of Munich), a specific design philosophy. Request for membership stayed high, in spite of the mandatory 150 work hours (later 300) that had to be completed before admission.

In 1934, the Nazi organisation "Deutscher Luftfahrt-Verband (DLV)" (German Aeronautical Association) was put in charge of all German Akafliegs. The Akaflieg Munich was renamed in "Aero-technical Task Group" and was assigned considerable state funds in order to continue research on 'war-crucial' tasks and projects. In fact, Nazi officials tried to use and canalize the energy and ideas of the young student researchers for their war plans and ideologies. In 1938, the ISTUS (International Study Commission on Gliding) started an international contest on the construction of an 'Olympic Standard Glider' for the 1940 Olympic Games. The Akaflieg Munich participated with the project Zwei Forschungsrichtungen konkurrierten Anfang der 50er Jahre in der Akaflieg München: die Mü10/Mü13-Linie (Mü-Profil, Stahlrohrrumpf), aus der die Mü23Mü17 which finished second. (The Mü17 is still in use today.) During the Second World War, the Nazi organization "Reichs-Luftfahrt-Ministerium (RLM)" incorporated the Akaflieg for war purposes. Under its supervision, projects like the Mü18, a glider for measurement purposes, and the stunning DM-project were pursued. Flying and glider pilot training was interrupted during the war.

After liberation, flight operation and aeronautical research was not permitted in Germany. It took till 1949 until university students and professors founded a so-called "Association for Aerodynamics".They started out in the old Akaflieg facilities in the university's tower and the workshop at the Prien airfield. They operated a blueprint shop to gather some money, and built a solid wooden sail for a sailboat on the Chiemsee lake. In 1951, the Mü10 'Milan' was re-activated from the German Museum in Munich where the glider had survived the war. Three gliders - a Mü13 reproduction, the "Spatz" (sparrow) and the "Specht" (woodpecker) - were acquired, later a Klemm tow plane was added. With a state-funded research project by the Ministery of Traffic and Transportation, the Akaflieg continued glider construction and launched the first after-war project, the Mü22.

 

Two design philosophies rivaled each other in the 50's: the Mü10/Mü13-line (Mü-profile and steel framework fuselage) from which the Mü23 evolved, and the new Mü22-line, which featured modern laminar profiles, Der Huckebein wird aufgehangenand ideas of the young student researchers for their war plans and ideologies. In 1938, the ISTUS (International Study Commission on Gliding) started an international contest on the construction of an 'Olympic Standard Glider' for the 1940 Olympic Games. The Akaflieg Munich participated with the project Mü17 which finished second. (The Mü17 is still in use today.) During the Second World War, the Nazi organization "Reichs-Luftfahrt-Ministerium (RLM)" incorporated the Akaflieg for war purposes. Under its supervision, projects like the Mü18, a glider for measurement purposes, and the stunning DM-project were pursued. Flying and glider pilot training was interrupted during the war.

 

Buy cheap web hosting service where fatcow web hosting review will give you advices and please read bluehost review for more hosting information.
Free Joomla Templates designed by Web Hosting Top